The Future of Psychedelic and Medical Marijuana Research - Andrew Weil, M.D.

Published:
5/26/2010

The Future of Psychedelic and Medical Marijuana Research Forty years ago, a U.S.-led global backlash ended the possibility of researching potential beneficial effects of psychedelics and marijuana. Many studies had shown psychedelics to be useful for managing anxiety and depression in terminal cancer patients, for treating alcoholism and opiate addiction, and for catalyzing spiritual/mystical experiences. At the same time marijuana was found to be effective for relieving the nausea and vomiting often associated with cancer chemotherapy. Now that restrictions on research with these agents are easing, a new generation of investigators is continuing these studies, as well as looking at MDMA for PTSD, psilocybin for OCD, and marijuana for MS, chronic pain, PTSD and other conditions. Contemporary research on positive effects of psychedelics and marijuana needs to be carefully designed and conducted to avoid another backlash from anti-drug zealots. This video is from Psychedelic Science in the 21st Century, a conference taking in place in San Jose, California on April 15-18, 2010. The conference was organized by the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) in collaboration with the Heffter Research Institute, the Council on Spiritual Practices, and the Beckley Foundation. Medical doctors, nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and other health professionals can earn Continuing Medical Education/Continuing Education (CME/CE) credits by viewing these videos through the Spiritual Competency Resource Center (SCRC) at www.spiritualcompetency.com. This video was produced by Teal Sievers of Living Dream Films (www.livingdreamfilms.com). To learn more about MAPS or to support our work, visit www.maps.org.

Advertisement
Advertisement