Understanding the Many Medical Marijuana Uses - Medical Marijuana, Inc.

www.medicalmarijuanainc.com
Date:
Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019

The use of marijuana for medicinal purposes dates back centuries. From its earliest known use in Ancient China to today, our awareness of potential medical marijuana uses has grown.

In the United States, cannabis was widely utilized as a patented medicine during the 19th and early 20th centuries. It’s been only in the last few decades, however, that researchers and medical experts started to truly understand medical marijuana benefits.

With that growing acknowledgement of cannabis and its therapeutic effects, attitudes toward the substance have shifted dramatically. This has led a significant expansion in legal access throughout the United States and the globe.

Keep reading to learn more about the wide array of medical marijuana uses, and the science behind cannabis’ therapeutic potential.

Medical marijuana refers to using the cannabis plant or its extracts to treat symptoms of an illness or a disease.

Facilitate recovery following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) Vaped ordabbed: Heating up marijuana to its respective boiling point with a vaporizer to release cannabinoids and other active ingredients as an inhalable vapor. Smoked: Setting fire to marijuana in the form of a hand-rolled joint, pipe, gravity bong or water pipe to release cannabinoids as an inhalable smoke. Eaten: Swallowing marijuana in the form of an edible, such as a cookie, gummy, or beverage. Taken under the tongue: Placing liquid-form marijuana under the tongue for 60-90 seconds and allowing it to absorb through the mucous membranes of the mouth. Applied topically: Applying cannabis-infused body products like balms, salves, lotions, and oils, directly onto the skin for targeted effects. Baker, D., Pryce, G., Croxford, J.L., Brown, P., Pertwee, R.G., Huffman, J.W., and Layward, L. (2000, March 2). Cannabinoids control spasticity and tremor in a multiple sclerosis model. Nature, 404(6773), 84-7. Retrieved from http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v404/n6773/full/404084a0.html. Blair, R.E., Deshpande, L.S., Sombati, S., Falenski, K.W., Martin, B.R., and DeLorenzo, R.J. (2006, June). Activation of the cannabinoid type-1 receptor mediates the anticonvulsant properties of cannabinoids in the hippocampal neuronal culture models of acquired epilepsy and status epilepticus. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 317(3), 1072-1078. Retrieved from http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/317/3/1072.long. Boychuck, D.G., Goddard, G., Mauro, G., and Orellana, M.F. (2015 Winter). The effectiveness of cannabinoids in the management of chronic nonmalignant neuropathic pain: a systematic review. Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, 29(1), 7-14. Croxford, J.L., Pryce, G., Jackson, S.J., Ledent, C., Giovannoni, G., Pertwee, R.G., Yamamura, T., and Baker, D. (2008, January). Cannabinoid-mediated neuroprotection, not immunosuppression, may be more relevant to multiple sclerosis. Journal of Neuroimmunology, 193(1-2), 120-9. Retrieved from http://www.jni-journal.com/article/S0165-5728(07)00396-7/fulltext. Fox, P., Bain, P.G., Glickman, S., Carroll, C., and Zajicek, J. (2004, April). The effect of cannabis on tremor in patients with multiple sclerosis. Neurology, 62(7), 1105-9. Retrieved from http://www.neurology.org/content/62/7/1105.long. Kubajewska, I., and Constantinescu, C.S. (2010, August). Cannabinoids and experimental models of multiple sclerosis. Immunobiology, 215(8), 647-57. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0171298509001442. Lynch, M.E., and Campbell, F. (2011, November). Cannabinoids for treatment of chronic non-cancer pain; a systematic review of randomized trials. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 72(5), 735-744. Pavisian, B., MacIntosh, B.J., Szilagyi, G., Staines, R.W., O’Connor, P., Feinstein, A. (2014, May 27). Effects of cannabis on cognition in patients with MS: a psychometric and MRI study. Neurology, 82(21), 1879-87. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4105254/. Potter, C.M., Vujanovic, A.A., Marshall-Verenz, E.C., Bernstein, A., and Bonn-Miller, M.O. (2011, April). Posttraumatic stress and marijuana use coping motives: the mediating role of distress tolerance. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 25(3), 437-43. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3101637/. Preet, A., Ganju, R.K.., and Groopman, J.E. (2008, January). Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits epithelial growth factor-induced lung cancer cell migration in vitro as well as its growth and metastasis in vivo. Oncogene, 27(3), 339-46. Retrieved from http://www.nature.com/onc/journal/v27/n3/full/1210641a.html. Wallace, M.S., Marcotte, T.D., Umlauf, A., Gouaux, B., and Atkinson, J.H. (2015, July). Efficacy of Inhaled Cannabis on Painful Diabetic Neuropathy. Journal of Pain, 16(7), 616-27. Webb, C. W., & Webb, S. M. (2014). Therapeutic Benefits of Cannabis: A Patient Survey. Hawai’i Journal of Medicine & Public Health, 73(4), 109–111. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3998228/.

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