What are terpenes and why do they matter?  | CBD Oils UK

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Date:
Thursday, Dec 27, 2018

For many people the word “terpene” is a strange and unfamiliar term. But as science and technology carry us to a better understanding of cannabis, we’re beginning to see that there’s a lot more to this healing plant than its cannabinoid content.

In the following article we will discuss the many beneficial compounds found in cannabis, and introduce you to the amazing world of terpenes. These special compounds definitely deserve your attention.

An introduction to cannabis.

Cannabis is an incredible plant which has been utilised for its therapeutic properties for thousands of years. Although CBD is the cannabis compound that has been receiving the most attention over the past few years, the cannabis plant actually contains hundreds of compounds which all contribute to its potential health benefits.

The cannabis plant produces as many as 400 compounds; cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids. There are also many nutritious components in cannabis including an abundance of vitamins and minerals, fibre, essential fatty acids and protein. So cannabis and hemp are great additions to any healthy diet.

Liquid terpenes. Available in many different varieties. We have worked hard to produce the highest grade, strain specific plant derived terpene formulations. Customers can create bespoke CBD oil and vape liquid formulations using our all natural terpene blends. We recommend you add our plant derived terpenes to your favourite CBD oil/extracts and e-liquid vape juice. Terpene infused CBD crystals 90% CBD- 10% terpenes. This high quality product has been individually infused with cannabis terpene profile molecules. It’s an exceptional quality CBD extract, flavoursome and aromatic. A CBD concentrate infused with 100% cannabis terpene profiles. 85% CBD crumble – THC free – full terpene profile. Our super high concentrate full spectrum 85% CBD wax crumble contains 850mg CBD in 1 gram. It also contains the full spectrum of cannabinoids, terpenes and healthy fatty acids.  Myrcene (earthy, musky, fruity): Myrcene can be found in mangoes, hops, thyme, lemongrass, and basil, and is the most commonly found terpene in cannabis. It can compose up to 50 percent of a cannabis plant’s terpenes. Pinene (pine): Pinene actually comes in two types: alpha, which smells like pine needles and is the most commonly found terpene in nature, and beta, which smells like rosemary, basil, dill, or parsley. Pinene is also found in conifer trees, citrus peels, and turpentine. Caryophyllene (peppery, woody, spicy): Caryophyllene is a sesquiterpene found in many plants such as Thai basils, cloves, cinnamon leaves and black pepper, and in minor quantities in lavender. It’s aroma has been described as peppery, woody and/or spicy. Limonene (citrus): Limonene is another common terpene found in cannabis. Like its name suggests, limonene smells like lemons, oranges, mandarins, limes, and grapefruits. It’s also probably found in your favourite cleaning products or perfumes because of its’ citrusy scent. Linalool (floral, spicy): Linalool is found in flowers and spices like lavender and coriander. It is a common ingredient in perfumes because of its pleasant floral aroma. It is naturally found in lavender, citrus, mint, cinnamon, and birch. Humulene (hoppy, earthy): Humulene is found in hops, coriander, cloves, and basil. It is responsible for the distinct bouquets and flavours of a number of well-known herbs and products. Beer would not be beer without the hoppy taste that humulene gives to the hop plant. Terpinolene (piney, herbal, floral): Terpinolene is a common component of sage and rosemary. Its largest use is in soaps and perfumes. It is also a great insect repellent. Terpinolene is known to have a piney aroma with slight herbal and floral nuances. Camphene (woodsy, fir needles): Camphene, a plant-derived monoterpene, emits pungent odors of damp woodlands and fir needles. It is a minor component of many essential oils such as turpentine, camphor oil, citronella oil and ginger oil. It is used as a food additive for flavouring, and also used in the preparation of fragrances. Myrcene.Myrcene is the most abundant terpene in cannabis. In fact, a study in Switzerland revealed myrcene composes up to 50 percent of the terpene content in the cannabis plant. The aroma offers an earthy, fruity scent, and the taste offers a mango with hints of mint experience. Myrcene is also plentiful in mango, hops, eucalyptus, thyme, and lemongrass. Pinene. Caryophyllene (also known as beta-caryophyllene). Limonene. Limonene is another abundant terpene both in cannabis and other plants. It offers a fresh, sweet aroma with a hint of citrus. It’s been shown to have sedative and motor relaxant effects, and also has antioxidant and antibacterial properties. Linalool. Linalool has been used in aromatherapy for thousands of years. While best known for giving lavender its distinct scent, linalool is also present in cannabis varieties. The flavour is lemony with hints of coriander, lavender, and rose. This terpene produces a variety of effects and is most widely recognised for reducing stress. Humulene. 7. Terpinolene is a common component of sage and rosemary and is found in the oil derived from Monterey cypress. Its largest use is in soaps and perfumes. Terpinolene is known to have a piney aroma with slight herbal and floral nuances.Terpinolene has been found to be a central nervous system depressant[28] used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety. Further, terpinolene was found to markedly reduce the protein expression of AKT1 in K562 cells and inhibited cell[29] proliferation involved in a variety of human cancers. Camphene. Camphene, a plant-derived monoterpene, emits pungent odors of damp woodlands and fir needles. It is a minor component of many essential oils such as turpentine, camphor oil, citronella oil and ginger oil. It is used as a food additive for flavouring, and also used in the preparation of fragrances.

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